Posters/Signs

Tribal members and citizens throughout Wisconsin joined forces to oppose fast-track mining legislation introduced in the Wisconsin Legislature in late 2011. The proposed bill gutted environmental protections and ignored Native American treaty rights. Pictured here (left to right) are Sherrole Benton (Green Bay, WI), Bill Krupinski (Jefferson, WI) and Laura Gauger (Duluth, MN). Recognition of tribes as sovereign nations was written into the U.S. constitution in 1787, so that is why the logo on the sign pictured here refers to that date (State Capitol, Madison, WI, January 25, 2012).

Tribal members and citizens throughout Wisconsin joined forces to oppose fast-track mining legislation introduced in the Wisconsin Legislature in late 2011. The proposed bill gutted environmental protections and ignored Native American treaty rights. Pictured here (left to right) are Sherrole Benton (Green Bay, WI), Bill Krupinski (Jefferson, WI) and Laura Gauger (Duluth, MN). Recognition of tribes as sovereign nations was written into the U.S. Constitution in 1787, so that is why the logo on the sign pictured here refers to that date (State Capitol, Madison, WI, January 25, 2012).

1.  WATER “RESERVED.”  In early 2012, Bill Krupinski (“The People’s Cartoonist”) designed, with input from a Bad River tribal elder, a logo used in the battle to protect Wisconsin’s Penokee Hills and wild rice waters from the mining industry’s grasp. The logo, which at the time was made freely available to those “fighting the good fight,” is just as relevant today. Whether it’s the Bad River, Menominee River, Wolf River, Lake Superior or any other water resource, the purity of that water has been and must continue to be “reserved” for future generations. In the same Spirit as when the “WATER RESERVED” logo was first designed and made freely available to the public, please use the logo in any way you see fit – posters, banners, T-shirts, stationery … . The only thing we ask is that you please do not alter the artwork.

Water 1787_Ltr

If you click on the above image, the attached file is scaled for printing on regular (letter size) paper. If you click HERE, the attached file is a bit larger and scaled so it can be made into 18″ x 24″ posters.

2.  WALLEYE-OMETER.

A second Bill Krupinksi illustration, this one with definite ties to the Flambeau Mine situation, is his “Walleye-Ometer.” Between 1991 and 2011, the owner of the Flambeau Mine (Kennecott/Rio Tinto) was required to test walleye in the Flambeau River for heavy metal accumulation, both upstream and downstream of the mine site. Before the mine was built in 1993, the upstream walleye had higher levels of copper and zinc in their liver tissue than the downstream fish. That reversed in 1996 (at the height of mining); for the next ten years (1996‐2006) higher levels of copper and zinc were measured in the downstream fish. Bill’s depiction of the 2005 data is shown below, and, if you care to make copies, you can access the file by clicking on the image. The only thing we ask is that you please do not alter the artwork.

Walleye_Ometer_cr

What the future holds for the walleye in the Flambeau River is unknown. Polluted groundwater from the Flambeau Mine site continues to enter the river through fractured bedrock, but, with the end of mandatory walleye testing in 2011, Kennecott is now “off the hook.”

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